Sri Lanka Currency 100 Rupees banknote 2010

Sri Lanka Currency 100 Rupees banknote 2010 Central Bank of Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka Currency 100 Rupees banknote 2010 Dancers

Currency of Sri Lanka 100 Rupees banknote 2010
Central Bank of Sri Lanka

Obverse: The Norochcholai Coal Power Plant Project is at the center of the note, above which is the Laxapana waterfall with the cables that transmit the hydro-power generated by the waterfall. The bird on the right is the Sri Lankan Orange Billed Babbler (Turdoides rufescens) and the butterfly on the left is the Autumn Leaf (Doleschallia bisaltidae).
  Sri Lankan Lion with sword facing left at upper right. Numeric 100 at upper left and lower right. At bottom center the value in Sinhala, நூறு ரூபாய் in Thamil and ONE HUNDRED RUPEES in English, of decreasing font size. Bank name in Sinhala at Top center, with smaller இலங்கை மத்திய வங்கி in Thamil and English CENTRAL BANK OF SRI LANKA on next line. Size of digits in serial number increase in size. Horizontal Black Serial number on upper left and vertical Red Serial number on right. Security Thread Thin polyester thread embedded in note with the letters CBSL RS100.

Reverse: When the back of the note is viewed vertically, a Mridangam drummer is seated playing his drum. To his right is a Bharatanatyam dancer. The Naga (seven headed cobra) guard-stone is at the top right. The double floral design called the “Dvithva Liya Vela” appears on the right.
  Numeric 100 at upper left and lower right. Face value in Sinhala, நூறு ரூபாய் in Thamil and ONE HUNDRED RUPEES in English, in 3 lines of decreasing font size, at lower left. Bank name in Sinhala, இலங்கை மத்திய வங்கி in Thamil and CENTRAL BANK OF SRI LANKA in English, in 3 lines, of decreasing font size, at center upper left.
Printer Thomas De la Rue, Sri Lanka, in tiny text DE LA RUE in bottom right.

Watermark: Cornerstone plus on left same image of Orange-billed babbler flipped to right, darker than background with vertical 100 lighter than background to the right.
Predominant Colour: Orange.
Dimensions: 138 x 67 mm.



Norochcholai coal power plant
The Norochcholai coal power plant is a lead project of the government to enhance economic growth and ensure balanced regional development through cost effective power sector development. It is expected that this first coal power plant in Sri Lanka will cater to the increasing demand of electricity initially by 300 MW with an ultimate capacity of 900 MW when fully developed.

Laxapana Waterfall
Laxapana waterfall, one of the beautiful creations of Mother Nature is 129m high and is situated in Hatton area in the Nuwara Eliya district. It is formed by the Maskeliya Oya. The fall gives rise to twin hydroelectricity power stations, Laxapana and New Laxapana.

Sri Lankan Orange Billed Babbler - Turdoides rufescens
Sri Lanka Orange -billed Babbler is an old world babbler with soft fluffy plumage, short rounded wings and a weak flight. It is distinguished from its rufous colouration and orange beak and legs. It is an endemic, common in the wet zone forests and adjacent gardens. This bird is categorized as vulnerable by the IUCN.

The Autumn Leaf - Doleschallia bisaltidae
As its name suggests its wings are similar to the bright amber coloured leaves. It has bright orange colour forewings and its underside resembles a dead leaf, which gives it greater measure of camouflage. Its camouflage makes it harder to spot.

Naga guard stone
The cobra was considered as the guardian of water and treasure. It is suggested that the guard stone carved with the nagaraja symbol at the entrance to ancient buildings represents protection to the building. The sculpture of multi-headed cobra incorporates the belief that when people die they are reincarnated as cobras to protect the treasures.

Dvithva Liya vela
Traditional Sinhalese art has a floral motifs depicted with two similar creepers called Dvithva liya vela. These flower bands are combined or run parallel to each other in a regular pattern.

Bharatanatyam 
Bharatanatyam is a classical Indian dance form popular in Sri Lanka. In ancient India, the devadasis had performed Bharatanatyam in Tamil Nadu. Women wear a typical saree in the dance performance, men have bare chest and wear a dhoti-like outfit in the lower part of the body. It is performed with the knees of the dancers bent and the dance form uses hand movements to convey different kinds of emotions to the audience. The main drum used is the Mridangam

Mridangam
The Mridangam is a doubleesided drum used as accompaniment in the Bharatanatyam dances. It is also the main percussion instrument used in Carnatic concerts.